Necrotising Fasciitis - Advances in diagnosis and management

Necrotising Fasciitis – Advances in diagnosis and management

A 40 year old man underwent a minor elective day case lower limb soft tissue operation. 72 hrs later he began to feel unwell and developed fevers and rigors. He was seen first thing in the morning with increasing pain and inflammation extending up from the foot to the knee. Intravenous antibiotics were started on admission. He was in theatre having a debridement by late morning, by which time the inflammation had spread to the inner thigh. He was in profound septic shock with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. During the debridement, it was noted that the inflammation had spread to his pelvis. He had a laparotomy and it was determined that the resection he would require was unsurvivable. Treatment was withdrawn and he died on the operating table.

How is necrotising fasciitis diagnosed and how is it managed?

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IV Immunoglobulin for Necrotising Fasciitis

IV Immunoglobulin for Necrotising Fasciitis

A 40 year old woman presented with painful swelling of the right side of the neck. She had previously suffered a haematological malignancy and received a bone marrow transplant. A presumptive diagnosis of necrotising fasciitis was made and the neck, shoulder and chest underwent surgical debridement. Postoperatively, the patient remained ventilated in septic shock. Further debridement was required at 24 hours. Group A streptococcus was grown from the debrided tissue and IV immunoglobulins was commenced. The patient gradually weaned from support and was discharged from ICU several days later.

Does IV immunoglobulin have a role to play in the treatment of necrotising fasciitis?Read More »

Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

A young woman presented with a 2 week history of fever, sweats and had developed a maculopapular rash. She had been commenced on oral antibiotics a week earlier for a presumed lower respiratory tract infection. After her admission, her rash developed into generalised bullous lesions and she became hypotensive and oliguric. A dermatologist diagnosed toxic epidermal necrolysis.

How should Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis be managed?
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