Hyponatraemia and Renal Replacement Therapy

A 63 year old woman was admitted to the ICU from the Emergency Department with acute alcohol withdrawal, severe hyponatraemia (serum sodium level 114mmol/L), rhabdomyolysis (creatine kinase 46930u/L) and acute kidney injury (serum creatinine 262umol/L, urea 8.7mmol/L, potassium 4.6mmol/L, base excess -6.8 and anuric from the point of admission). Her corrected calcium level was 1.92mmol/L. She had been discovered on the floor at home after a presumed fall. It was unknown how long she had been on the floor, but there were extensive pressure injuries to the left elbow, buttocks and left leg. A CT scan of the brain had excluded significant acute intracranial pathology and a 12 lead ECG showed atrial fibrillation at a rate of 130 beats per minute.

The patient was intubated and mechanically ventilated to allow emergency treatment. She was sedated with remifentanil and propofol. Intravenous pabrinex and enteral chlordiazepoxide was given to treat her alcohol withdrawal, aiming for early extubation if possible. A low-dose noradrenaline infusion was required to maintain a mean arterial pressure ≥65mmHg. Calcium replacement was prescribed and full pressure relief measures were instituted. No specific treatment was given to rate control or cardiovert the patient.

The patient was clinically hypovolaemic, but since the duration of hyponatraemia was unknown (with suspicion of some chronicity related to alcohol dependence), aggressive fluid resuscitation was avoided. Continuous veno-veno haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) was commenced using standard replacement fluid at a post-filter replacement rate of 10ml/kg/hr-1 and dialysate flow rate of 10ml/kg/hr-1 (blood pump at 200ml/hr). Concomitantly, a 5% dextrose infusion was administered; the rate of infusion and net fluid loss through ultrafiltration were adjusted constantly with a view to restoring euvolaemia over 24 hours while increasing serum sodium to a maximum level of 120mmol/L over the same time period. This strategy was continued the following day with a target sodium of 128mmol/L, thereafter tight control of sodium correction was relaxed.

She was extubated on day 3 and renal replacement was discontinued on day 4. The patient was discharged from ICU on day 6. At the point of discharge her serum sodium concentration was stable at 142mmol/L. She was neurologically intact.

What are the challenges in managing hyponatraemia in critically ill patients?Read More »

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Thrombotic Thrombocytopaenic Purpura

A previously fit and well 64 year old gentleman presented to the acute medical unit with a two-week history of lethargy, bruising, dark urine and an episode of transient facial numbness, blurred vision and dysarthria lasting 30 minutes. Clinical examination revealed mild jaundice, multiple bruises and a palpable liver edge but was otherwise normal. His respiratory rate was 14 breaths/minute with normal oxygen saturations. He was in sinus rhythm with a pulse of 68 beats/minute and non-invasive blood pressure was 130/70. He was GCS 15 and was apyrexial.

His full blood count revealed a haemoglobin of 94 g/L, platelets 9 x109/L, and white cell count 9 x109/L. A blood film showed red cell fragmentation, spherocytes, polychromasia, poikilocytosis and no platelet clumps. Reticulocytes and lactate dehydrogenase were raised at 168.6 x 109/L and 3027 iu/L respectively. Liver function tests revealed a bilirubin of 49 µmol/L but were otherwise normal. A liver ultrasound showed fatty infiltration. Clotting was normal and direct antiglobulin test negative. Urea and electrolytes were normal, creatinine 80 µmol/L and the C reactive protein was 37. ADAMTS13 assay showed complete absence of activity. CT brain was normal.

He was reviewed by the haematologists who diagnosed thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and referred him to the intensive care unit for plasma exchange. He received a three-day course of methylprednisolone, was intubated due to agitation, received plasma exchange with octaplas replacement that increased from 2 litre to 5 litre exchanges, and rituximab 750mg.

He deteriorated progressively with: vomiting, anaemia requiring blood transfusions, worsening thrombocytopenia, acute kidney injury with a peak creatinine of 457 µmol/L, an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction, and a posterior cerebral artery territory infarct.

On day 5 he developed fixed and dilated pupils. Mannitol 1g/kg was administered and an urgent CT brain performed. This revealed multiple infarcts in both cerebral hemispheres and right cerebellum, loss of grey-white differentiation, 5mm midline shift and low cerebellar tonsils.

After discussion with the neurosurgeons it was decided this was an unrecoverable injury. In agreement with his family, end of life care was instituted and he died within 24 hours.

Describe the management of Thrombotic Thrombocytopaenic Purpura.Read More »

Metformin Associated Lactic Acidosis

Metformin Associated Lactic Acidosis

A 65-year-old female, presented with epigastric pain and a 3-day history of diarrhoea and vomiting, dry mouth and breathlessness. She had also experienced a transient loss of vision three days earlier. Her past medical history included type 2 Diabetes, hypertension (on ramipril), hypothyroidism. On arrival, her GCS was 15/15. She was tachypnoeic (respiratory rate 31 breaths/minute) but maintained oxygen saturations at 98% on high-flow oxygen. On auscultation, she had bibasal crepitations.  She was tachycardic (irregularly irregular pulse of 130 beats/minute), had cool peripheries and dry mucous membranes. Her BP was 105/39mmHg. She had tenderness in her lower abdomen. Her initial arterial blood gas revealed a marked metabolic acidosis (pH <6.8, pO2 23.1, pCO2 1.9) with unrecordable bicarbonate and lactate levels. She was referred to the surgical and critical care teams with a working diagnosis of ischaemic bowel secondary to an embolic phenomenon (atrial fibrillation and possible amaurosis fugax).

She was resuscitated in ED with 4 litres of crystalloid but rapidly deteriorated, requiring vasopressor support to maintain her blood pressure. Her metabolic disturbance did not not correct with resuscitation and her lactate now registered as >15. Bloods showed Na 140, K+ 6.3, urea 35, Cr 1105. A decision to intubate was made in view of a deteriorating conscious level and need for urgent filtration and invasive monitoring. Noradrenaline (0.3mcg/kg/min) and dobutamine (26mcg/kg/min) were required to achieve a satisfactory blood pressure and she was commenced on CVVHDF. She was considered to unstable for transfer to CT or an emergency laparotomy. Her metabolic disturbance remained severe (pH<6.8 and lactate 13.9).

Within 24 hours her metabolic state had improved (pH 7.19, pO2 7.19, PCO2 2.5, HCO3 10, BE -28.1, Lac 6.7) and she became more cardiovascular stability. A CT effectively excluded an intra-abdominal catastrophe. Renal failure secondary to dehydration complicated by Metformin Associated Lactic Acidosis (MALA) appeared to be the most likely presentation. Her condition continue to stabilise and her vasopressor support and RRT was weaned over the next 7-10 days

What are the risk factors, clinical features and management of metformin associated lactic acidosis?Read More »

Ethylene Glycol Poisoning

Ethylene Glycol Poisoning

A 50 year old man was found by the roadside by paramedics with a GCS of 13. On arrival he had a patent airway, but a GCS of 5 (E1 M3 V1). He had an elevated respiratory rate (30/min) and a profound metabolic acidosis (pH 6.97 pO2 16.8 pCO2 1.68 HCO3 2.8 BXS -30.8 COHb 0). The lactate was too high to be measured by the blood gas analyser and there was an elevated anion gap [(147+5.5) – (2.8+ 109) = 40.7] He was cardiovascularly stable with warm peripheries. His ECG revealed a prolonged QTc. He was intubated and 8.4% sodium bicarbonate was administered. His initial laboratory bloods showed CRP 11, white cell count 29.5 CK 2539 creatinine 213. Ethanol levels were <10 and Paracetamol and salicylate levels were within normal limits. He was given a dose of intravenous cefotaxime and his urine was sent for organic acids screening which revealed an enormous peak of glycolic acid and small increase in oxalic acid, consistent with an overdose of ethylene glycol.

After arrival in intensive care, the sodium bicarbonate had improved the pH to 7.2, with a residual lactaemia (15 as measured in the laboratory, without any interference from glycolic acid). CVVHDF was commenced. In order to inhibit futher metabolism of the ethylene glycol, 10% ethanol was commenced until fomepizole was available (an initial bolus of 800ml, followed by an infusion at 180ml/hr). Ethanol levels were monitored. Fomepizole was administered later that day abd the ethanol stopped (15mg/kg loading and 1mg/kg/hr). The renal function deteriorated despite CVVHDF (peaked at urea 28, creatinine 724 on day 4), which was continued for 5 days. Treatment for aspiration pneumonia was started in day 1 and cardiovascular support was continued (noradrenaline). Intermittent boluses of glycopyrolate were required to treat the bradycardia associated with fomepizole. A gradual improvement occurred and he had made a full neurological recovery within 2 weeks, with much improved renal function. He later admitted to drinking 250ml of antifreeze.

What are the clinical features and management of ethylene glycol poisoning?Read More »

Haemofiltration in Sepsis

Haemofiltration in Sepsis

A young IV drug user was admitted with septic shock secondary to staphylococcal sepsis with bilateral shadowing on CXR. He rapidly required intubation due to hypoxia, and institution of vasopressor support. He had a significant metabolic acidosis and consequently was commenced on haemofiltration. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a large tricuspid vegetation. After 48 hours of haemofiltration, his acidosis haf normalised, and pressor requirements had reduced. He had a prolonged respiratory wean before being transferred to a cardiothoracic centre.

What is the role of haemofiltration (or other modes of renal replacement therapy) in severe sepsis and septic shock?
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Hepatorenal Syndrome

Hepatorenal Syndrome

A 54 year old man with a history of alcohol excess was admitted under the medical team with an upper gastro-intestinal bleed. He had a background of pulmonary fibrosis that limited his exercise tolerance to 30 yards. Antibiotics, terlipressin and fluid resuscitation, including blood, were given. An oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy demonstrated severe portal gastropathy but no active bleeding or varices. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated cirrhosis and some moderate ascites. On day two of the patient’s hospital admission he was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and non-invasive ventilation was started. Over the next few days his condition deteriorated and he required vasopressor support. By day 6 the patient was oliguric, and his creatinine had risen from 102 to 155 µmoles/l.

What is the cause for his acute kidney injury? Could it be hepatorenal syndrome? Read More »

Mannitol and Sodium Bicarbonate in Rhabdomyolysis

Mannitol and Sodium Bicarbonate in Rhabdomyolysis

A patient with polytrauma develops compartment syndrome with an ischaemic leg 24hrs into his admission. He undergoes revascularisation and fasciotomies, but develops rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury with a CK that peaks at over 100,000.

Is there a role for mannitol and bicarbonate in the management of his rhabdomyolysis and AKI?Read More »

Loop Diuretics in Acute Kidney Injury

Loop Diuretics in Acute Kidney Injury

A 65 year old woman underwent an elective mitral valve repair (MVR) and four vessel coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedure. Pre-operatively she was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD) secondary to hypertensive nephropathy, and chronic airway disease secondary to smoking. Her baseline creatinine was 275. Surgery was uneventful but in the post-operatively period she developed pulmonary oedema and worsening acute kidney injury (AKI). On day 2 her creatinine reached 420 and oliguria occurred (urine output < 0.5 ml kg-1 hr-1). Non-invasive respiratory ventilation provided adequate support and maintained a normal blood PaCO2 and pH, although her base excess drifted to -7 mmol l-1.Dopamine was administered at 2–10 μg kg-1 min-1, titrated to MAP ≧ 75 mmHg; pericardial pacing continued to maintain sinus rhythm at 60 bpm; her CVP was 14 mmHg and stable. Furosemide was started and given by a continuous infusion of 10 mg hr-1 after an initial bolus of 100 mg to try and help with diuresis.

Is there any evidence to support the use of loop diuretics in acute kidney injury?

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Understanding acute kidney injury

Understanding Acute Kidney Injury

A young man was presented to ED with confusion and a profound metabolica acidosis after ingesting around 400ml of ethylene glycol-based anti-freeze. His GCS deteriorated and he required intubation. He was commenced on iv ethanol and commenced on haemodiafiltration. He initially had a polyuric acute kidney injury, but became anuric after 24 hours. His acidosis normalised within 36 hours, and his creatinine peaked at 549. His urine output improved after a week of oligoanuria and his creatinine reached a baseline of around 150.

What are the diagnostic criteria for acute kidney injury?

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